Sunday School lessons for Gospel Doctrine Class

Friday, April 26, 2019

“What Shall I Do to Inherit Eternal Life?”





Scripture links are hyperlinked to Scriptures at ChurchofJesusChrist.org
and will open in a new window.
Resource quotes have been highlighted in blue and are noted at the end of the blog


Jesus summarized His mortal mission when he said "The Son of man is come to save that which is lost." He continues that mission even today, through His spirit that leads us to the church where we learn His gospel, how to serve and how to help save. As we become His disciples we participate in the continuing of His ministry by sharing our knowledge, bringing others home and enduring. But have you ever asked yourself, "Is there more I should know?"

We need to know, as the Apostles were taught, how to repent daily, be the best we can be, do good, choosing that better part and come unto Him.  But sometimes in our mortal states we are not sure how to accomplish this or become distracted and even confused.  In the study of Matthew 18 and Luke 10 let us ask this question to ourselves, "Is there more I should know?", inquiring of the Lord for promptings and impressions that will give us spiritual knowledge in obtaining not just the freely given resurrection but eternal life with God.  

Matthew 18; Luke 10

These chapters of the New Testament contain many examples of gospel teachings that are different from what the world teaches; many of which are hard for people to accept. In Matthew 18 Jesus instructed His disciples to humble themselves and become as little children. He also explained that those who “offend” little children, lead them astray, or cause them to stumble in the faith, would be subject to the justice of God. The Savior then counseled His disciples to remove from their lives those things that could offend them, or cause them to stumble He told them what a person should do if someone trespasses, or sins, against him or her. He also taught the Apostles principles of Church discipline. The Savior told His Apostles that if a person refused to acknowledge his or her wrongdoing and confess his or her sin, and two or more witnesses testified against him or her, that person would be cut off from the Church. With His instruction and guidance those who preside over Church disciplinary councils where such decisions are made, always seek the Lord’s will regarding whether an individual should be cut off from the Church, or excommunicated. In Luke 10 along with calling seventy leaders to help the Apostles testify and teach of Christ He instructed us about our decisions, particularly when we must decide between several good choices.


Part 1: We must forgive others if we are to receive forgiveness from the Lord. Matthew 18:21–35

At one time or another we all need to forgive someone who has offended us. The aim of gospel teaching is to teach Gods children and have them apply the principles and doctrines found in the scriptures, become converted, and receive the blessings promised to the faithful and obedient.  In heeding the principle of forgiveness we can gain much understanding and peace.  I invite you now, as we study this gospel teaching to  ponder whom you may be withholding forgiveness from,then pray for a desire to forgive and the ability to let go of hurt and anger.  In doing so Jesus Christ can help not only you feel peace and comfort through His Atonement but also those who have hurt you.  

Matthew 18:21–35:  
21 ¶ Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?
22 Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven.
23 ¶ Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, which would take account of his servants.
24 And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.
25 But forasmuch as he had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be sold, and his wife, and children, and all that he had, and payment to be made.
26 The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
27 Then the lord of that servant was moved with compassion, and loosed him, and forgave him the debt.
28 But the same servant went out, and found one of his fellowservants, which owed him an hundred pence: and he laid hands on him, and took him by the throat, saying, Pay me that thou owest.
29 And his fellowservant fell down at his feet, and besought him, saying, Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
30 And he would not: but went and cast him into prison, till he should pay the debt.
31 So when his fellowservants saw what was done, they were very sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.
32 Then his lord, after that he had called him, said unto him, O thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because thou desiredst me:
33 Shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellowservant, even as I had pity on thee?
34 And his lord was wroth, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due unto him.
35 So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses.


What did Peter ask the Savior about forgivness?  Matthew 18:21  Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?  

To gain a clear understanding of the teaching it is important to also understand the times in which the teaching was given.  At this particular time in Israel some religious leaders taught that an individual did not need to offer forgiveness to another person more than three times. Thus in asking the Lord if he should forgive someone seven times, Peter may have thought he was being generous.  However the Lord teaches us the truth with His answer.  

How many times did the Savior say we should forgive those who offend or sin against us?  Matthew 18:22   Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven.  “Seventy times seven” is a way of saying we should put no limit on the number of times we forgive others.

The answer ‘seventy times seven’ (a hyperbolic quantity, meaning indefinitely) is for those who sin against us but repent. And for those who sin against us and refuse to repent, the first three times we are still obligated to forgive, but the fourth time the testimonies against the sinner are to be brought before the Lord. If sincere repentance and restitution ensue, forgiveness is required; but if there is no repentance, the sinner is given over to the judgments of God. All of this additional instruction is given in Doctrine and Covenants 98:39–48, the law of forgiveness” (D. Kelly Ogden and Andrew C. Skinner, Verse by Verse: The Four Gospels [2006], 371–72).

Note that the phrase “thou shalt not forgive” in Doctrine and Covenants 98:44 means that unrepentant perpetrators should be held fully accountable for their actions. It does not mean that we should withhold forgiveness from or continue to feel animosity toward them (Doctrine and Covenants and Church History Seminary Teacher Manual [Church Educational System manual, 2013], 349).

Why is it sometimes difficult to forgive?  Because we have been hurt or wronged...

What truth can we learn from the Savior about forgiving others?  The Lord has commanded us to forgive those who offend or sin against us.

What does it mean to forgive others?
  To forgive others is to treat with love the person who has offended or hurt us and to have no unkind feelings toward him or her.  Forgiving does not mean that we continue to allow others to harm us or that the offender should not be held accountable for his or her actions, legally or otherwise.  (Guide to the Scriptures, “Forgive,” scriptures.lds.org; D&C 64:9–11)

To further emphasize the importance of forgiving others, Jesus gave the parable of the unmerciful servant Matthew 18:23–35

23 ¶ Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, which would take account of his servants.
24 And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.
25 But forasmuch as he had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be sold, and his wife, and children, and all that he had, and payment to be made.
26 The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
27 Then the lord of that servant was moved with compassion, and loosed him, and forgave him the debt.
28 But the same servant went out, and found one of his fellowservants, which owed him an hundred pence: and he laid hands on him, and took him by the throat, saying, Pay me that thou owest.
29 And his fellowservant fell down at his feet, and besought him, saying, Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
30 And he would not: but went and cast him into prison, till he should pay the debt.
31 So when his fellowservants saw what was done, they were very sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.
32 Then his lord, after that he had called him, said unto him, O thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because thou desiredst me:
33 Shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellowservant, even as I had pity on thee?
34 And his lord was wroth, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due unto him.
35 So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses.

Who do the king and servants represent?  Matthew 18:35.  In this parable, the king represents the Lord; the first servant represents each of us, who stand in debt to the Lord; and the second servant represents anyone who may have offended us.

How are we like the king’s servant in our debt to the Lord? Matthew 18:24–27.  
24 And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.
25 But forasmuch as he had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be sold, and his wife, and children, and all that he had, and payment to be made.
26 The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
27 Then the lord of that servant was moved with compassion, and loosed him, and forgave him the debt.

It’s difficult to know the exact values of the amounts of money mentioned in the parable of the unmerciful servant Matthew 18:23–35.  However, there are clues in the New Testament that can help us understand the vast difference between the 100-pence debt and the 10,000-talent debt.  

The fellowservant in the parable owed the smaller debt of 100 pence. In Matthew 20:2, a penny (the singular form of the word pence) is the wage paid for a day’s work in a vineyard. Therefore, the fellowservant would have to work for 100 days to earn 100 pence to pay his debt. But this amount is extremely small when compared to the 10,000-talent debt of the unmerciful servant.  In Matthew 25:14–15, a man’s entire fortune, or“his goods” are valued at only eight talents. Therefore, it would take the combined, accumulated wealth of over 1,000 men like this man to pay the unmerciful servant’s debt.

Traditionally 10,000 talents equaled 100,000,000 denarii or Roman currency. One denarius was a typical day’s wage for a common laborer”Now calculate how many years it would take for the servant to pay off this debt by dividing 100,000,000 denarii by 365 days (100,000,000/365 = 273,973). the answer is 273,973 years...

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland shared what he learned about the parable of the unmerciful servant while attending an institute class:  “[The teacher] noted that the 100-pence forgiveness, which we were all expected to give one another and acknowledged as a pretty fair amount of money, was … preciously little to ask in light of the 10,000-talent forgiveness Christ had extended to us.

“That latter debt, our debt, was an astronomical number, [the teacher] reminded us, almost incapable of comprehension. But that, he said, was exactly the Savior’s point in this teaching, an essential part of the parable. Jesus had intended that his hearers sense just a little of the eternal scope and profound gift of his mercy, his forgiveness, his Atonement.

“… For the first time in my life I remember feeling something of the magnitude of Christ’s sacrifice for me—a gift bordering to this day on incomprehensibility. But a gift that made me, for the first time, seriously consider my need to forgive other people and to be unfailingly generous regarding their feelings and their needs and their circumstances”
(“Students Need Teachers to Guide Them” [Church Educational System satellite broadcast, June 20, 1992]).

What must we do to be forgiven of our “debt”?   Repent daily, be the best we can be, do good, choosing that better part, come unto Him, and...Forgive others...

Again, what truth can we learn from the Savior about forgiving others? The Lord has commanded us to forgive those who offend or sin against us.

Why?  Why does he command us to forgive?  If we want God to forgive us, then we must be willing to forgive others.  Ephesians 4:32  Matthew 6:12–15

 32 And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.

12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.
14 For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you:
15 But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

President James E. Faust taught us that: “We need to recognize and acknowledge angry feelings. It will take humility to do this, but if we will get on our knees and ask Heavenly Father for a feeling of forgiveness, He will help us. The Lord requires us ‘to forgive all men’ [D&C 64:10] for our own good because ‘hatred retards spiritual growth’ [Orson F. Whitney, Gospel Themes (1914), 144]. Only as we rid ourselves of hatred and bitterness can the Lord put comfort into our hearts. …
“… When tragedy strikes, we should not respond by seeking personal revenge but rather let justice take its course and then let go. It is not easy to let go and empty our hearts of festering resentment. The Savior has offered to all of us a precious peace through His Atonement, but this can come only as we are willing to cast out negative feelings of anger, spite, or revenge. For all of us who forgive ‘those who trespass against us’ [Joseph Smith Translation, Matthew 6:13], even those who have committed serious crimes, the Atonement brings a measure of peace and comfort” (James E. Faust, “The Healing Power of Forgiveness,” Ensign May 2007, 69)

Also to help us understand President Thomas S Monson tells a story of incredible faith in forgiveness: “[The] father was a cabinetmaker and fashioned a beautiful casket for the body of his precious child. The day of the funeral was gloomy, thus reflecting the sadness they felt in their loss. As the family walked to the chapel, with Father carrying the tiny casket, a small number of friends had gathered. However, the chapel door was locked. The busy bishop had forgotten the funeral. Attempts to reach him were futile. Not knowing what to do, the father placed the casket under his arm and, with his family beside him, carried it home, walking in a drenching rain. If the family were of a lesser character, they could have blamed the bishop and harbored ill feelings. When the bishop discovered the tragedy, he visited the family and apologized. With the hurt still evident in his expression, but with tears in his eyes, the father accepted the apology, and the two embraced in a spirit of understanding” (“Hidden Wedges,” Ensign, May 2002, 19).

Elder Richard G. Scott helped us understand how we are blessed for forgiving others: “Forgiveness heals terrible, tragic wounds, for it allows the love of God to purge your heart and mind of the poison of hate. It cleanses your consciousness of the desire for revenge. It makes place for the purifying, healing, restoring love of the Lord” (“Healing the Tragic Scars of Abuse,” Ensign, May 1992, 33).

And President Dieter F. Uchtdorf taught the following about forgiveness: “Remember, heaven is filled with those who have this in common: They are forgiven. And they forgive” (“The Merciful Obtain Mercy,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2012, 77).

Part 2 To obtain eternal life, we must love God and our neighbors  Luke 10: 25-37

Through the parable of the good Samaritan, Jesus teaches about charity:   

25 ¶ And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? 
26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?
27 And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself.
28 And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
29 But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?
30 And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.
31 And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side.
32 And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.
33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,
34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
36 Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?
37 And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.
38 ¶ Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.
39 And she had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard his word.
40 But Martha was cumbered about much serving, and came to him, and said, Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve alone? bid her therefore that she help me.
41 And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things:

42 But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her.

What did the Lawyer ask the Savior? Luke 10:25 And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

How did Jesus respond to the lawyer who asked what he should do to inherit eternal life? Luke 10:26–28 

26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?
27 And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself.
28 And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.


What principle do we learn from these verses concerning what we must do to obtain eternal life? To obtain eternal life we must love God and love our neighbor as ourselves

According to verse 27, how must we love God?  Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength

What does it mean to love God with all your heart, soul, strength, and mind?


What was the lawyer’s second question?   Luke 10:29
29 But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour? 

What was the answer Jesus gave? Luke 10:30-37  
30 And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.
31 And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side.
32 And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.
33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,
34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
36 Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?
37 And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.


What does this parable teach about who our neighbors are?  President Howard W. Hunter said: “We need to remember that though we make our friends, God has made our neighbors—everywhere. Love should have no boundary; we should have no narrow loyalties” (Conference Report, Oct. 1986, 44; or Ensign, Nov. 1986, 35

What did the priest and Levite do when they saw the man who had been robbed and wounded? Luke 10:31–32

31 And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side.
32 And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side. 

In the written law of Moses, priests and Levites were assigned to serve God and their fellowmen, both in the temple and as teachers and exemplars of God’s law. These priesthood bearers were fully aware of the commandment to “love thy neighbour as thyself” (Leviticus 19:18). In fact, Levites were specifically charged with helping travelers economically and in other ways (see Leviticus 25:35–36). In the Savior’s parable, however, the priest and the Levite violated these commandments—both noticed the wounded man yet “passed by on the other side” (Luke 10:31–32). The priest and Levite were following the oral law or tradition of the rabbis, which stated that Jews were not bound to deliver non-Jews or those of unknown ethnicity from death, for such a person was not a neighbor. The priest and Levite were within the bounds of oral law or tradition, but they were not within the pure law of Moses.  (New Testament Student Manual)

What are some reasons we do not help others in need?  Mosiah 4:16–19

How did the good Samaritan help the man who had been robbed and wounded?  Luke 10:33–35.   The Samaritan treated the injuries of the wounded man with oil and wine, both of which have medicinal value. Oil was used to soothe and wine to disinfect. Wine and oil are also symbolic of the Atonement of Christ (see Matthew 26:27–29 and the commentary for Matthew 26:36). The oil and wine used by the Samaritan can be seen as symbolic of the Christlike love he showed to the wounded Jew. Other aspects of this parable further remind us of the Savior’s atoning act. Like the good Samaritan, Jesus Christ saves those in need of help. He has compassion and heals the spiritual wounds of sin. He saves us from death. Jesus brings us to safety and employs others to help us. Through His Atonement, Jesus Christ has personally paid the price for our recovery.  (New Testament Student Manual)

When have you felt like the "certain man" who needed help desperately? How did help come?

What truth can we learn from this parable about how we can obtain eternal life? Each of us needs the Atonement of Jesus Christ to obtain eternal life.

Part 3 We choose "that good part" by making daily choices that lead to eternal life. Luke 10:38–42

Think for a minute about the choices you made yesterday.  Now take a minute to list as many of those choices as you can on a sheet of paper or your journal then put a mark by the choices that you thought were particularly good.  Were there times when you had to choose between two good choices for that day?  Now read Luke 10:38–42, and look for a principle the Savior taught that can guide us in our decisions, especially when more than one good choice is available to us.  

38 ¶ Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.
39 And she had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard his word.
40 But Martha was cumbered about much serving, and came to him, and said, Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve alone? bid her therefore that she help me.
41 And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things:
42 But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her.


What did Mary do while the Savior was in the home?   Luke 10:38 And she had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus’ feet, and heard his word. 

What did Martha do? (the word cumbered in verse 40 refers to being burdened.)  40 But Martha was cumbered about much serving,

What did Martha ask the Savior that indicates she was worried about temporal matters?  and said, Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve alone? bid her therefore that she help me. 

What did the Savior answer? Luke 10:41-42
41 And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things:
42 But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her.


Hospitality was very important in Jewish society, and a woman’s honor and reputation depended partly on how well she fulfilled cultural expectations regarding the role of hostess. Because of these social customs, Martha’s complaint that her sister, Mary, had left her to serve alone would have been seen as justified by many people of the time. But the Savior responded to Martha by commending her sister’s choice: “Mary hath chosen that good part”  One of the things the Savior’s response clarified is that there are higher priorities than social customs, even if they are good customs. President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency observed that righteous members of the Church must, like Mary, learn to discern those activities that are most important in life:

Just because something is good is not a sufficient reason for doing it. The number of good things we can do far exceeds the time available to accomplish them. Some things are better than good, and these are the things that should command priority attention in our lives.

“Jesus taught this principle in the home of Martha. … It was praiseworthy for Martha to be ‘careful and troubled about many things’ (v. 41), but learning the gospel from the Master Teacher was more ‘needful.’ The scriptures contain other teachings that some things are more blessed than others (see Acts 20:35; Alma 32:14–15). …

“Consider how we use our time in the choices we make in viewing television, playing video games, surfing the Internet, or reading books or magazines. Of course it is good to view wholesome entertainment or to obtain interesting information. But not everything of that sort is worth the portion of our life we give to obtain it. Some things are better, and others are best. …


“Some uses of individual and family time are better, and others are best. We have to forego some good things in order to choose others that are better or best because they develop faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and strengthen our families” (“Good, Better, Best,” Ensign, Nov. 2007, 104–5, 107)

How might you have reacted to the Savior's counsel if you had been in Martha's place? 

Sister Bonnie D. Parkin, former Relief Society General President, taught: “Mary and Martha are you and me. … These two loved the Lord and wanted to show that love. On this occasion, it seems to me that Mary expressed her love by hearing His word, while Martha expressed hers by serving Him. … Jesus did not dismiss Martha’s concern, but instead redirected her focus by saying choose ‘that good part.’ And what is that? … The one thing that is needful is to choose eternal life [see 2 Nephi 2:28]. We choose daily” (“Choosing Charity: That Good Part,” Ensign Nov. 2003, 104).  

How can we know what things in our lives are needful?  By seeking the council of the Lord and remembering that if we choose to devote ourselves to spiritual matters over temporal concerns, then we will receive the knowledge and direction we seek along with lasting blessings.

The nature of Martha   Luke 10:40–42
Elder Gregory A. Schwitzer of the Seventy invited Church members not to hastily misjudge Martha for being “careful and troubled about many things” on this one occasion:  “Many Sunday lessons have been taught using this story which have cast Martha in a lesser position in terms of her faith. Yet there is another story of this great woman, Martha, which gives us a deeper view of her understanding and testimony. It happened when the Savior arrived to raise her brother, Lazarus, from the dead. On this occasion it was Martha whom we find going to Jesus ‘as soon as she heard’ He was coming.”The Savior shared with Martha the “great doctrine of the resurrection” and asked her if she believed in Him.

“She responded with her powerful testimony: ‘Yea, Lord: I believe that thou art the Christ, the Son of God, which should come into the world’ [see John 11:20–27]. 


“Many a sister has often heard the first story and wondered if she were a Mary or a Martha, yet the truth lies in knowing the whole person and in using good judgment. By knowing more about Martha, we find she was actually a person of deep spiritual character who had a bold and daring testimony of the Savior’s mission and His divine power over life. A misjudgment of Martha may have caused us not to know the true nature of this wonderful woman” (“Developing Good Judgment and Not Judging Others,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2010, 103–4).

Conclusion
The importance of following the Savior’s example by humbling ourselves, forgiving others, and showing charity for one another is extremely significant in our gospel learning. Thus he has given us parables that teach us those things which we truly need to know. Who is my neighbor? Anyone who needs my help and love. Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? A child. Is it enough to forgive an offender seven times? No, you should forgive seventy times seven. These are the teachings that help us gain peace not only for ourselves but for everyone. If we are seeking the Lord’s will, not to “justify ourselves Luke 10:29, but because we really want to learn from Him, because we really want to know "is there more i need to know"; the Lord will teach us how to live in a way that leads to eternal life with Him.


Resources: 
Old Testament Student Manual
Ensign
Conference Reports
New Testament Institute Manual
Doctrine and Covenants Manual
Church History Manual
Seminary Manual
D. Kelly Ogden and Andrew C. Skinner, Verse by Verse: The Four Gospels 
Guide to the Scriptures

No comments:

Post a Comment

The Fall of Adam and Eve

  Scriptures are hyperlinked to Scriptures at ChurchofJesusChrist.org Resource quotes have been highlighted in blue and are noted at the end...