Sunday School lessons for Gospel Doctrine Class

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Jesus Christ, “the Author of Eternal Salvation”



Scripture links are hyperlinked to Scriptures at ChurchofJesusChrist.org
Resource quotes have been highlighted in blue and are noted at the end of the blog

What would you give up in order to accept the gospel of Jesus Christ? In order to be baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ, one must abstain from drinking, smoking, coffee, tea, cigarettes, pre-marital sex and the like. Some like to teach that we have to give up nothing, that God simply accepts who we are and what we do and there are no requirements or discipline. But when one truly studies the scriptures, particularly the New Testament, we find the real fact is that we all have to give up something in order to accept the gospel of Jesus Christ; whether that be bad habits, incorrect beliefs, unwholesome associations, or something else.

For Gentiles back in the day, conversion often meant abandoning false gods. For the Hebrews (Jews), however, conversion proved to be a little more complicated. Their cherished beliefs and traditions were rooted in the worship of the true God and the teachings of His prophets, extending back thousands of years. Yet the Apostles taught in the book of Hebrews that the law of Moses had been fulfilled in Jesus Christ and that a higher law was now the standard for believers. Would accepting Christianity mean that the Hebrews must give up their earlier beliefs and history?

The Epistle to the Hebrews sought to help settle such questions by teaching that the law of Moses, the prophets, and the ordinances are all important, but Jesus Christ is greater.  In fact, all these things point to and testify of Christ as the Son of God and the promised Messiah the Jews had been waiting for. The message for the Hebrews, and for all of us as we  begin our study of Hebrews 1–5 is that sometimes we must give up traditions to make Jesus Christ the center of our worship and our lives; for it is through Christ “that we may obtain mercy” (Hebrews 4:16).

History and Background
All followers of Jesus Christ will experience trials of their faith, and they may at times wonder if they should abandon their faith. The Epistle to the Hebrews was written to encourage a group of Christians to keep believing and not to return to their former ways. Hebrews also shows the significance of many symbols found in the law of Moses and their fulfillment in Jesus Christ. For this reason, the book of Hebrews is an excellent scriptural guide to understanding Old Testament teachings and practices. While the scriptures are replete with references to Jesus Christ’s atoning sacrifice, His Resurrection, and His Ascension into heaven, Hebrews emphasizes the ongoing work of the Redeemer in the lives of all who turn to Him in obedience and faith.

Rather than being strictly an epistle, Hebrews is more of a homily—an extended sermon that makes its points by repeated appeals to Israel’s scriptures and practices. It is the longest sermon in scripture on why and how Jesus Christ is superior to all things. Hebrews teaches that Jesus Christ is greater than the law because He gave the law, that the prophets received power through faith in Him, that He was the great High Priest in whom the sacrifices of Old Testament times were fulfilled, and that He has precedence over the angels.

The book of Hebrews is one of the few places in the Bible where we can read about the prophet Melchizedek Hebrews 5. Hebrews teaches that the priesthood named after Melchizedek is greater than the Aaronic Priesthood, and it shows that salvation is found not in the law of Moses or in the ordinances administered by Levitical priests but in Jesus Christ and the ordinances of the Melchizedek Priesthood. For example, the high priest of old entered the tabernacle and offered the blood of a lamb as a sacrifice for Israel’s sins. Jesus Christ, the greatest High Priest and the true Lamb of God, offered His own blood to atone for sin, entered the heavenly sanctuary, and thereby made possible the salvation of all mankind. Hebrews accentuates this greater excellence of Christ’s sacrifice: it is through His atoning sacrifice that we may receive a remission of sins. Hebrews 11:1–12:4 provides a distinct discourse on faith and teaches how individuals can trust in Jesus Christ.

Chapter Summaries
Hebrews 1–4. Paul testifies that Jesus Christ, the Only Begotten Son of Heavenly Father, is our Savior.  Jesus Christ is in the express image of the Father. He is greater than angels and all the prophets who preceded Him, including Moses. Those of ancient Israel who were brought out of Egypt failed to enter the Lord’s rest because they hardened their hearts against Jesus Christ and His servant Moses. 

Hebrews 5; 6 Paul explains that the Melchizedek Priesthood is a part of the fulness of the gospel.  As a High Priest, Jesus is superior to all the Mosaic high priests. Through His suffering, Christ was perfected. We can enter the Lord’s rest and “go on unto perfection” through obedience to God’s word.

Part 1: Hebrews 1–5 Jesus Christ is “the author of eternal salvation.”
Paul taught the Saints about the true nature of Jesus Christ. He also taught them about the Atonement of Jesus Christ and some of the blessings that come as a result of the Atonement. Paul shared the experience of the ancient Israelites wandering in the wilderness to teach the Saints what they must do to enter into the rest of the Lord. As well, throughout his missionary journeys, Paul sought to convince the members of the Church that they should no longer practice the law of Moses. While the Jewish Christians had been taught that salvation comes through faith in Jesus Christ, many of them still believed that obedience to the law of Moses was essential to their salvation. Paul wrote the epistle to the Hebrews to reemphasize that the law of Moses had been fulfilled in Christ.

What do we learn about Jesus Christ from Hebrews 1?

1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,
2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;
3 Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high;
4 Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.
5 For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?
6 And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.
7 And of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire.
8 But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom.
9 Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.
10 And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:
11 They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment;
12 And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.
13 But to which of the angels said he at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool?
14 Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?


1. He created the world  Hebrews 1:2, 10

2.  Jesus Christ is in the express image of the Father Hebrews 1:3 The phrase “express image of the Father” means that Jesus Christ both physically and spiritually personifies Heavenly Father and shares His divine character, and the phrase “upholding all things by the word of His power” indicates that Jesus Christ is all powerful.

3. He is the Firstborn Son of God the Father Hebrews 1:5-6

4. His glory and power are eternal and unchanging  Hebrews 1:8, 12

5. Jesus Christ speaks for the Father Hebrews 1:2

6. Jesus Christ is the heir of the Father Hebrews 1:2

7. Jesus Christ upholds all things by the word of His power Hebrews 1:3

8. Jesus Christ purges our sins Hebrews 1:3

9. Jesus Christ reigns at the right hand of the Father  Hebrews 1:3

How might knowing these truths help someone who is struggling to remain faithful to Jesus Christ and His gospel?

A theme in the book of Hebrews is the superiority of Jesus Christ. For example, in Hebrews 1:4–14, Paul showed that Jesus Christ is greater than the angels. In subsequent chapters, he continued to show the excellency and superiority of Christ.

How would knowing that Jesus Christ is greater than all things help someone who is struggling to remain faithful to Him?

Part 2: Hebrews 2:9–18; 4:12–16; 5:7–8 Jesus Christ suffered all things so that He can understand and help those who suffer.

May be you or someone you know is suffering trials and sometimes feel forsaken and hopeless.  Hebrews 2:9–18; 4:12–16; 5:7–8 can build faith to help us turn to Heavenly Father and the Savior for help. 

What truths do they find in these verses that can help or that you can share?
9 But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.
10 For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings.
11 For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren,
12 Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee.
13 And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me.
14 Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;
15 And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.
16 For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

17 Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.

18 For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted.12 For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.
13 Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.
14 Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession.
15 For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.
16 Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.

7 Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared;
8 Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered;

In Hebrews 2, Paul explained more about the nature and identity of Jesus Christ to the Jewish converts to help them see why they should continue to follow Jesus Christ.

How did Paul refer to Jesus Christ?  The Captain

What is Jesus Christ the captain of?  Jesus Christ is the Captain of our salvation.

In what way is Jesus Christ the Captain of our salvation?  “to make reconciliation for the sins of the people” in verse 17 means that Christ atoned for our sins, allowing us to be reconciled, or brought into a harmonious relationship, with Heavenly Father.

According to Hebrews 2:9, what did Jesus Christ do for all people?
9 But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

According to Hebrews 2:14, who did the Savior conquer through His Atonement?
14 Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;
Paul not only referred to the Savior as the Captain of our salvation, but he also called Him “a merciful and faithful high priest” Paul likened Jesus Christ to a Jewish high priest because the high priest was viewed as a mediator between the people and God.

According to Hebrews 2:17, what enabled Jesus to be such a merciful and faithful high priest?17 Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.

According to Hebrews 2:18, why is the Savior able to succor (help) us? See also Alma 7:11–13.
11 And he shall go forth, suffering pains and afflictions and temptations of every kind; and this that the word might be fulfilled which saith he will take upon him the pains and the sicknesses of his people.
12 And he will take upon him death, that he may loose the bands of death which bind his people; and he will take upon him their infirmities, that his bowels may be filled with mercy, according to the flesh, that he may know according to the flesh how to succor his people according to their infirmities.
13 Now the Spirit knoweth all things; nevertheless the Son of God suffereth according to the flesh that he might take upon him the sins of his people, that he might blot out their transgressions according to the power of his deliverance; and now behold, this is the testimony which is in me.


In Hebrews 4:14–16 Paul provided additional insight to his teaching about how the Savior is a merciful and faithful high priest.

What makes Jesus Christ such a great high priest?  President John Taylor taught: “It was necessary when the Savior was upon the earth, that he ‘should be tempted in all points like unto us,’ and ‘be touched with the feelings of our infirmities,’ [see Hebrews 4:15] to comprehend the weaknesses and strength; the perfections and imperfections of poor fallen human nature; and having accomplished the thing he came into the world to do, having had to grapple with the hypocrisy, corruption, weakness, and imbecility of man—having met with temptation and trial in all its various forms, and overcome, he has become ‘A faithful high priest’ [see Hebrews 2:17] to intercede for us in the everlasting kingdom of his Father. He knows how to estimate, and put a proper value upon human nature, for he, having been placed in the same position as we were, knows how to bear with our weaknesses and infirmities, and can fully comprehend the depth, power, and strength of the afflictions and trials that men have to cope with in this world, and thus understandingly and by experience, he can bear with them as a father and an elder brother” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: John Taylor [2001], 204–5)

Based on what you learned from Hebrews 2:14–18 and 4:14–16, why is Jesus Christ able to understand us perfectly and sympathize with all our frailties and imperfections?  Because Jesus Christ suffered and was tempted in all things, He understands us perfectly and can help us in times of need. 

Scriptural examples of people comforted by Jesus Christ:

John 8:1–11: The Lord comforted the woman taken in adultery.

John 11:1–46: The Lord comforted Mary and Martha after the death of their brother, Lazarus.

Enos 1:4–6: The Lord forgave Enos’s sins and removed his guilt.

Mosiah 21:5–15: The Lord softened the hearts of the Lamanites so that they eased the burdens of the people of Limhi.

Mosiah 24:14–15: The Lord eased the burdens of Alma’s people.

Ether 12:23–29: The Lord’s words comforted Moroni.

3 Nephi 17:6–7: The Savior healed the Nephites of their infirmities.

Doctrine and Covenants 121:7–10: The Lord comforted Joseph Smith (see also D&C 123:17).

According to Hebrews 4:16, what can understanding this truth help us do?  Seek the Savior so that he can help us when we face difficult challenges.

What do you think it means to come boldly to the throne of grace?

Part 3: God’s blessings are available to those who “harden not [their] hearts.” Hebrews 3:7–4:2

Hebrews 3 and 4 contain a plea to the Saints not to harden their hearts and thereby reject the blessings God wanted to give them. Even though they had been converted to Christianity, some of the Jewish Saints found it difficult to fully accept the gospel of Jesus Christ and its blessings. By retelling the story of the ancient Israelites, Paul hoped to persuade the Jews to avoid the mistake their ancestors made rejecting God’s blessings because of unbelief.

As you read Hebrews 3:7–4:2, how can the experiences of the ancient Israelites apply to us today just as they applied to the Hebrews in the early Church?

1 Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling, consider the Apostle and High Priest of our profession, Christ Jesus;
2 Who was faithful to him that appointed him, as also Moses was faithful in all his house.
3 For this man was counted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who hath builded the house hath more honour than the house.
4 For every house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God.
5 And Moses verily was faithful in all his house, as a servant, for a testimony of those things which were to be spoken after;
6 But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end.
7 Wherefore (as the Holy Ghost saith, To day if ye will hear his voice,
8 Harden not your hearts, as in the provocation, in the day of temptation in the wilderness:
9 When your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my works forty years.
10 Wherefore I was grieved with that generation, and said, They do alway err in their heart; and they have not known my ways.
11 So I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.)
12 Take heed, brethren, lest there be in any of you an evil heart of unbelief, in departing from the living God.
13 But exhort one another daily, while it is called To day; lest any of you be hardened through the deceitfulness of sin.
14 For we are made partakers of Christ, if we hold the beginning of our confidence steadfast unto the end;
15 While it is said, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts, as in the provocation.
16 For some, when they had heard, did provoke: howbeit not all that came out of Egypt by Moses.
17 But with whom was he grieved forty years? was it not with them that had sinned, whose carcases fell in the wilderness?
18 And to whom sware he that they should not enter into his rest, but to them that believed not?
19 So we see that they could not enter in because of unbelief.

1 Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.
2 For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it.

How did the Israelites provoke the Lord? Hebrews 3:8–11

What do you think it means to “harden not your hearts”? Hebrews 3:15; 4:7
To keep your heart open, willing, and obedient to God and His commandments.

What are the consequences of having a hard heart?

What is causing people to harden their hearts in our day? 

What can we do to keep our hearts soft and responsive to the will of the Lord? Ether 4:15; Alma 5:14–15

15 Behold, when ye shall rend that veil of unbelief which doth cause you to remain in your awful state of wickedness, and hardness of heart, and blindness of mind, then shall the great and marvelous things which have been hid up from the foundation of the world from you—yea, when ye shall call upon the Father in my name, with a broken heart and a contrite spirit, then shall ye know that the Father hath remembered the covenant which he made unto your fathers, O house of Israel.

14 And now behold, I ask of you, my brethren of the church, have ye spiritually been born of God? Have ye received his image in your countenances? Have ye experienced this mighty change in your hearts?
15 Do ye exercise faith in the redemption of him who created you? Do you look forward with an eye of faith, and view this mortal body raised in immortality, and this corruption raised in incorruption, to stand before God to be judged according to the deeds which have been done in the mortal body?

What did Paul teach about how to enter the Lord’s rest? If we remain faithful to the Savior and harden not our hearts, we will enter into the rest of the Lord.


Consider how Hebrews 3:7–4:11 might apply to you. To do this, you might ponder questions like these:
When have I allowed my heart to become hardened? 

Are there any blessings God wants to give me that I am not receiving because of a lack of faith?
What can I do to develop a soft and contrite heart? Ether 4:15; Proverbs 3:5–6; Alma 5:14–15.

Part 4: Hebrews 5:1–5 Those who serve in God’s kingdom must be called of God.

Imagine that an acquaintance writes the title Doctor on a piece of paper and attaches it to his shirt. Even though he would be wearing a label displaying the proper title, what concerns would you have if this person attempted to operate on you after you had been in an accident? What concerns would you have if he wore a label displaying the title Law Enforcement Officer and tried to give you a ticket for doing something wrong?

Why would you be reluctant to trust this person to perform the tasks associated with the titles he took upon himself?

Despite wearing a label with the proper title, this person would lack the needed authority and ability to perform those tasks. Just as society has established ways to obtain authority to carry out certain responsibilities, God has established a way to obtain His authority to carry out certain responsibilities in His Church. As you study Hebrews 5, look for the pattern God has established to obtain His authority.

“Under the law of Moses, the presiding officer of the Aaronic Priesthood was called the high priest. The office was hereditary and came through the firstborn among the family of Aaron, Aaron himself being the first high priest of the Aaronic order.” The high priest usually served for the remainder of his life, but this office was eventually seized by wicked men. “High priests were inappropriately appointed and deposed at pleasure by Herod and the Romans alike. The office was filled by 28 different men between 37 B.C. and A.D. 68” (Bible Dictionary, “High priest”).

1 For every high priest taken from among men is ordained for men in things pertaining to God, that he may offer both gifts and sacrifices for sins:
2 Who can have compassion on the ignorant, and on them that are out of the way; for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity.
3 And by reason hereof he ought, as for the people, so also for himself, to offer for sins.
4 And no man taketh this honour unto himself, but he that is called of God, as was Aaron.
5 So also Christ glorified not himself to be made an high priest; but he that said unto him, Thou art my Son, to day have I begotten thee.


Paul taught that those who receive the priesthood must be called of God and that Jesus Christ was “called of God to be an high priest after the order of Melchisedec” (Hebrews 5:10). Paul encouraged Church members to have diligence, faith, patience, and hope in obtaining God’s promises.  The other message from Hebrews 5  is that priesthood holders being called of God applies to all who receive Church callings male and female.  

As society has established necessary qualifications and ways to obtain authority to carry out certain responsibilities, God has established necessary qualifications (such as faithfulness and worthiness) and ways to obtain authority to carry out certain responsibilities in His Church. In Hebrews 5 we find the pattern God has established for obtaining this authority. 


Who gave the Savior His authority? Heavenly Father  Hebrews 5:5 

What priesthood does Jesus Christ hold? The Melchizedek Priesthood. This priesthood was originally named after the Savior  D&C 107:2–4

What did Paul teach about the role of the high priest among the Israelites?  Hebrews 5:1–3  
The office of high priest referred to in these verses was, under the law of Moses, the presiding office in the Aaronic Priesthood. Aaron, Moses’s brother, was “the first high priest of the Aaronic order.” The office was hereditary; after the time of Aaron, the high priest was selected from among the firstborn descendants of Aaron and his sons. The high priest usually served for the remainder of his life, but this office was eventually seized by wicked men. “High priests were inappropriately appointed and deposed at pleasure by Herod and the Romans alike. The office was filled by 28 different men between 37 B.C. and A.D. 68” (Bible Dictionary, “High priest”)

How was the high priest to be chosen? Exodus 28:1  This interaction took place between God and Moses on Mount Sinai.
1 And take thou unto thee Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him, from among the children of Israel, that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office, even Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Aaron’s sons.

How was Aaron called of God to be ordained to the priesthood? Authority to serve in the Church comes from God, as Jesus Christ Himself exemplified.

Why is it significant that the Lord gave this instruction to Moses rather than to someone else? Moses was the prophet and was therefore authorized to receive such revelation and to govern the use of the priesthood on earth.

What must occur in order for someone to be ordained to the priesthood?  Those who are ordained to the priesthood must be called of God by revelation through His authorized servants. In the Church today, authorized priesthood leaders are to interview each candidate for ordination and seek the guidance of the Holy Ghost to determine a candidate’s readiness and worthiness to be ordained to the priesthood.  John 15:16

Both the Old and New Testaments show that priesthood holders received the priesthood through being ordained by an authorized holder of the priesthood. This practice continues in the Church today. President Boyd K. Packer taught: “The priesthood cannot be conferred like a diploma. It cannot be handed to you as a certificate. It cannot be delivered to you as a message or sent to you in a letter. It comes only by proper ordination. An authorized holder of the priesthood has to be there. He must place his hands upon your head and ordain you” (“The Aaronic Priesthood,” Ensign, Nov. 1981, 32).

How does this truth relate to the process of calling people to serve in positions in the Church?The fifth Article of Faith of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints states: We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.  **note that prophecy refers to revelation.

According to this article of faith, what else must occur in order for someone to be authorized “to preach the Gospel and administer in its ordinances”?  Both the Old and New Testaments record that prophets, priesthood holders, and gospel teachers received their callings by the laying on of hands by an authorized priesthood holder  Numbers 27:18–23; Acts 6:6; 13:2–3; 1 Timothy 4:14

How does the process of calling people to positions in the Church today reflect the pattern that was established in the scriptures?

In Hebrews 5:4–6, 10, Paul noted that Jesus received His authority from God the Father, just as Aaron and other ancient high priests were called of God and received their priesthood by proper authority, rather than taking the honor of the calling upon themselves. Articles of Faith 1:5 states: “We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.”

The Prophet Joseph Smith (1805–44) taught: “We believe that no man can administer salvation through the gospel, to the souls of men, in the name of Jesus Christ, except he is authorized from God, by revelation, or by being ordained by some one whom God hath sent by revelation. … Hebrews 5:4 [states], ‘And no man taketh this honor unto himself, but he that is called of God, as was Aaron.’—And I would ask, how was Aaron called, but by revelation?” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith [2007], 110; see also D&C 42:11).

Aaron was called of God by revelation to serve as the high priest, who represented the people before God in sacred matters and presided over other priesthood holders (the Levites). His calling came from God through a revelation to Moses: “And take thou thee Aaron thy brother … that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office” (Exodus 28:1). After the time of Aaron, the high priest was selected from among the priestly families descended from Aaron and his sons. In ancient Israel, the office of high priest was an office in the Aaronic Priesthood and was comparable to the office of Presiding Bishop of the Church in our day. Aaron’s sons and other Levites performed many tasks, including serving in the tabernacle, conducting the morning and evening sacrifices in the tabernacle and later in the Jerusalem temple, keeping watch over the fire of the sacred altar, and teaching the people of Israel the commandments. 
(New Testament Student Manual) 

Why is it important to know that priesthood authority can be received only in this way?


Conclusion 
Jesus Christ stands supreme above all of God’s creations, Jesus Christ is the Leader in the salvation of God’s children. As we hold fast to our faith in Jesus Christ, we will receive His grace and enter into His rest, and when we have hope, we have a spiritual anchor that helps us endure with confidence and ultimately receive the Lord’s promises.

Resources 
New Testament Student Manual
Seminary Manual
Ensign
Conference Reports
Articles of Faith
Doctrine and Covenants
Book of Mormon
Old Testament
Bible Dictionary

 

The Fall of Adam and Eve

  Scriptures are hyperlinked to Scriptures at ChurchofJesusChrist.org Resource quotes have been highlighted in blue and are noted at the end...